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Vehicle inspection News

Periodical Vehicle Inspection

Vehicle Inspection is the inspection and evaluation process of technical competence of motorized and non-motorized vehicles. TÜVTURK is the only authorized and assigned organization in Turkey for vehicle inspections.

This is the inspection and determination of the technical efficiency of motorized and non-motorized vehicles for approval. TÜVTÜRK, as the sole company authorized for vehicle inspection in Turkey performe this service in 81 cities, covering all Turkey, through 197 fixed and 73 mobil stations. Accreditation is a process in which certification of competency, authority, or credibility is presented. TÜVTURK is the first inspection institution accredited according to TS ISO EN 17020, this is the standart that defines the working condition and process for vehicle inspection institution.

Periodic Motor Vehicle Inspections and Roadworthiness Inspections are both mandatory in Turkey. The tests must be carried out at an authorised test centre. Vehicles that have not had the relevant test carried out may not be driven on the roads, and the owner may incur severe penalties.

TÜVTURK is the only company authorised to carry out the inspection and roadworthiness tests.

  • Appointment booking
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    : 0850 222 8888
    e-mail

Cars, motorbikes and trailers must be tested once they are three years old and every two years thereafter. Commercial vehicles must be tested after one year and each year thereafter.

Before carrying out either of the above tests, vehicles must undergo a vehicle emissions test. This can be carried out at a TÜVTURK authorised test station. Vehicles that are fitted with LPG must also be tested for gas leaks beforehand.

Periodic Motor Vehicle Inspections

The Periodic Motor Vehicle Inspection (Vize Günü). is the regular safety check for all vehicles. Roadworthiness inspections are only necessary for trucks, tractors and articulated lorries that transport goods to the EU.

All vehicles must be tested at authorised TÜVTURK test stations (Araç Muayene Istasyonları). There are also mobile test stations that visit small towns. Vehicles can turn up at these mobile stations without an appointment and wait their turn.

  • To find the schedule of Mobile Inspection Stations: Click here (In Turkish)

Documents required

Note: Copies are not accepted.

  • The vehicle's registration documents
  • Proof of valid vehicle insurance
  • Identity card, passport or driving licence
  • Proof of recent exhaust emissions test (less than one month old)
  • Proof of gas leak testing (less than one month old)
  • Tax clearance document, proving that there are no outstanding tax debts or traffic fines
  • Previous test certificate (if applicable)

For further information about Periodic Motor Vehicle Inspections: Click here (In Turkish)

Cost

Rates are determined by the Turkish Ministry of Transport. Vehicles that are tested after the due date of inspection are charged an additional five percent.

  • For further information on the cost of the tests: Click here (in Turkish)

Taking the test

The chassis number (şasi), engine number, and registration plate numbers must correspond to those indicated on the vehicle's registration document. The vehicle must carry a first aid kit, two warning triangles, a fire extinguisher and spare tyre (except for motorbikes).

The following are tested during the inspection:

  • Brake system - Fren sistemi
  • Steering system - Direksiyon sistemi
  • Vision features - Dikiz sistemi
  • Lamps, mirrors and electrical equipment
  • Axles, tyres, suspension - Dingil, lasktik
  • Compulsory equipment - Zorunlu ekipman
  • Noise pollution - Gürültü Kirliliği
  • Engine, transmission, oil leak control - Motor, gaz kaçağı kontrolü

If the vehicle passes the test successfully, a sticker is placed on the vehicle's front registration plate, indicating the validity period of the vehicle inspection test. The vehicle owner also receives a vehicle inspection certificate which needs to be taken to the next inspection.

If the vehicle fails the test, but is repairable, a temporary faulty vehicle sticker is placed on the vehicle's registration certificate. An unroadworthy vehicle will be reported to the Turkish Traffic Police. Repairs must be carried out within 30 days. If repairs are carried out within the time limit and the vehicle is retested at the same test station, the re-test is free of charge.

Roadworthiness Inspections (Yola Elverişlilik)

Roadworthiness inspections for trucks, tractors and semi-trailers that transport goods to the EU are carried out after the Periodic Motor Vehicle Inspections. These vehicles must be tested annually.

Documents required

  • The vehicle's registration documents
  • CEMT Certificate (Technical document provided by the manufacturer)
  • Proof of valid Periodic Motor Vehicle Inspection

It is possible to register for an appointment for the roadworthiness test online more information: Click here (In Turkish)

 

Private sector to start vehicle inspections

The countdown for the leasing of vehicle inspection stations to the private sector will start with an agreement expected to be signed next week.
The transfer of operation rights and all payments will be made, making TUVTURK -- the company established by the Doğuş-Akfen-TÜV SÜD consortium -- the new operator of inspection stations for the next 20 years. The privatization tender was first started in November 2004. The consortium will pay $300.2 million for the first region, consisting of cities in northern Turkey, and $313.2 million for the second region, which consists of 36 cities in the South. The consortium will pay the fee in cash in order to benefit from a 10 percent discount, a total payment of $552.2 million. There are 4.6 million vehicles in first region, which includes İstanbul, and 4.8 million vehicles in the second, which comprised Ankara, İzmir, Adana and Antalya.

 

10 August 2007, Friday

TODAY’S ZAMAN İSTANBUL

 

Tüvtürk to buy vehicle inspection stations after 2.5-year wait

 
 

The Supreme Privatization Board (ÖYK) has handed over its vehicle inspection stations to Tüvturk for $552.1 million. The bid was opened two-and-a-half years ago on Dec. 20, 2004; however due to lawsuits for the tender’s postponement, the deal was finally signed on Tuesday.

Tüvtürk -- a joint venture of Afken, Doğuş Automotive and the German Tüv Süd -- bid the highest amount and bought the north and south vehicle inspection stations. The contract amount was paid in cash.

Tüvtürk General Manager Nezih Çevik stated that they will serve to increase vehicle and traffic safety according to EU standards for vehicle inspection. The company will provide employment for more than 1,500 persons as a part of the project. The deal includes construction, maintenance and operation of the first and second region vehicle inspections. The company’s aim is to invest 633 million euros and establish 189 stations nationwide.  The privatization cost of the two regions was $613.5 million; however, due to a cash discount the first and second regions were bought for $270.2 million and $281.9 million, respectively. Tüvtürk will also conduct periodic inspections and exhaust emission tests and inspect roadworthiness, structure and correction certificates.

The ÖYK had approved the $613.5 million sale in February 2005. Since a local court allowed the concession agreement in April 2007, the joint venture has drawn a $552 million loan from a consortium under joint ABN Amro-Hypovereinsbank leadership in July 2007. Doğuş Holding CEO Hüsnü Akhan noted that within the 18 months following the deal’s signing, 189 immobile and 38 mobile stations will begin to operate.

The chief of Tüvtürk, Thomas Aubel, emphasized that the company’s profit for the next three years will correspond to the tender cost.

 

16 August 2007, Thursday

TODAY’S ZAMAN WITH WIRES ANKARA

 

 

 

New era knocking at the door of vehicle inspections

The first vehicle inspection station specifically designed in accordance with a new set of regulations and in line with more modern norms is entering service in Yalova next month.
This marks the first step into a new era in vehicle inspection: There will ultimately be 189 inspection stations accompanied by approximately 100 control points across Turkey, determined by the Ministry of Transportation, to check whether vehicle inspections have been properly completed. The procedure of establishing new stations started immediately after the TÜVTÜRK consortium won a privatization tender for vehicle inspection services. The state had given priority to the sale of these services to a private entity to ensure that the system is upgraded to European Union standards.

Talat Aydın, general manager of the Ministry of Transportation’s Land Transportation Directorate, confirmed that the ministry had approved a detailed working plan extending until 2009 submitted by TÜVTÜRK. This plan will change the vehicle inspection system completely, Aydın told the Anatolia news agency. According to the plan approved by the ministry, the second station will be opened in Elazığ by the end of this year. A total of 81 new stations will go into operation by next July. This number will rise to 177 by December and as of February 2009, it will grow to 189 stations scattered around the country.

The number of stations in a city is determined according the city’s vehicle density. In addition, the distance between any two stations in a single city will be no less than five kilometers. The plan suggests that there be 12 stations in İstanbul, seven in Ankara, eight in İzmir and Konya, and six in Bursa and Antalya. Furthermore, at least 38 mobile stations will also be on the road to serve some large districts, apart from city centers. New stations are being designed to serve for the inspection of any kind of land vehicle.

If a “severe defect” is found during inspection, especially in its braking system, a vehicle will be said to have a “gross fault” and will not pass the inspection. Owners of these vehicles will be given a month to have the repairs performed, and if the vehicle does not return to the inspection station in the period specified, it will be reported to the police. The new system will also have detailed information about all vehicles registered in a database; when the next inspection date of a vehicle approaches, a reminder note will be sent to the owner of the vehicle.

Aydın pointed out that the service level in vehicle inspection stations will be of incomparable quality and the highest of standards. Each vehicle’s data will automatically be transferred to the ministry’s database upon completion of the inspection, enabling the ministry to have access to information updated daily for every one of 10 million vehicles in Turkey. “Under the current system, vehicle owners wait in long queues and pay money. But the new system establishes a totally new perspective in terms of traffic safety.”

 

25 September 2007, Tuesday

TODAY’S ZAMAN WITH WIRES ANKARA

 

 

 

Vehicle inspections under EU standards on the way

The countdown to vehicle inspections under EU standards, which will encompass the checks of 12 million registered vehicles, has begun.
However, the training for the inspection staff at a pilot vehicle inspection station, specifically designed in accordance with a new set of regulations and in line with more modern norms, produced striking results; only two out of 15 vehicles in the training sample passed the inspections. Significant deficiencies were detected in the vehicles’ vital safety systems such as brakes and wheels.

The Transportation Ministry’s Land Transportation General Directorate had become concerned about the full implementation of the new system leading to chaos and thus decided to shift to the new system gradually. To this end, only the vital systems of the vehicles will be inspected in line with new norms, and other inspection items will be included on the checklist at a later date. An official from the directorate emphasized that it will take time for vehicle owners to get used to the new system. “It does not seem possible for a vehicle to pass with 1,200 different checks,” he said. However, he said they would implement the EU standards gradually for safety and to prevent environmental and economic loss. It is estimated that the new system will save $2.5 billion by preventing vehicles in poor condition from being driven.

The establishment of the new stations started immediately after the TÜVTÜRK consortium won a privatization tender for vehicle inspection services three years ago. However, the privatization process was delayed by two years because of lawsuits.

The first station was established in Yalova and will begin to serve in its full capacity in January 2008. According to the plan approved by the ministry, the second station will be opened in Elazığ by the end of this year. A total of 81 new stations will go into operation by next July. This number will be increased to 177 by December 2008 and as of February 2009, it will grow to 189 stations scattered across the country.

The number of stations in a city is determined according to the city’s vehicle density. In addition, the distance between any two stations in a single city will be no less than five kilometers. The plan suggests that there be 12 stations in İstanbul, seven in Ankara, eight in İzmir and Konya, and six in Bursa and Antalya. Furthermore, at least 38 mobile inspection stations will also be on the road to serve some of the larger districts, apart from city centers. The new stations are being designed to be able to inspect any type of road vehicle.

If a “severe defect” is found during an inspection, especially in its braking system, a vehicle will be said to have a “gross fault” and will not pass the inspection. Owners of these vehicles will be given a month to have the necessary repairs performed, and if the vehicle does not return to the inspection station in the period specified, it will be reported to the police. The new system will also have detailed information about all vehicles registered in a database; when the next inspection date of a vehicle approaches, a reminder notice will be sent to the owner of the vehicle.

 

01 November 2007, Thursday

İSA SEZEN İSTANBUL

 

 

 

New vehicle inspections start, many vehicles fail

Vehicle inspections in accordance with strict European standards have started in the eastern city of Elazığ, where inspectors are discovering that many vehicles on the road do not meet safety standards.
To test the inspection system's efficiency, TÜVTÜRK -- a joint venture between Akfen Holding, Doğuş Group and TüvSüd that outbid its rivals with $613.5 million to run vehicle inspection stations for 20 years -- began preliminary checks on vehicles on Jan. 11.

Of 280 vehicles inspected by the station over one week, major safety issues were found in 140 of them. Four of these cars were banned from roads because they failed to meet the majority of safety points.

The problems of the vehicles that failed to pass the inspection pointed to one of the reasons why there are so many traffic accidents in Turkey. Some 120 cars didn't pass the inspection due to the poor condition of their brake systems, whereas 23 vehicles were deemed extremely unsafe because of their worn-out tires and cracked roller bearings. Some had no seatbelts even on the driver's side, while others lacked a working horn. Many of the inspected cars also had serious problems in their gear systems.

The drivers with vehicles that did not pass have been given one month to have their vehicles repaired. They will not be asked to pay for their second visit unless they have failed to fix the defects in the time allotted. If they don't come to the inspection stations on time, they will have to pay 5 percent of the inspection cost per month as a fine.

The company has established its second station in Trabzon and plans to construct modern stations all across Turkey over the next year. The Elazığ station cost $700,000 to build and has the capacity to inspect 84 vehicles per day -- 60 passenger cars and 24 commercial vehicles. Roughly 63,000 cars are registered in Elazığ. By 2009, there will be 259 inspection stations in Turkey. Before the privatization, vehicle inspections were being performed by state officials without the help of modern equipment, rather using traditional methods such as visual checks. With the new system, however, 936 different car parts will be checked.

 

26 January 2008, Saturday

İSA SEZEN İSTANBUL

 

 

Half of vehicles fail inspection this year

Ministry of Land Transportation Deputy General Manager Mehmet Nesip Kemaloğlu has said that 47 percent of 98,441 vehicles failed inspection carried out at private vehicle inspection stations since the beginning of the year.

Talking about the private vehicle inspection stations, established after the government decided to privatize vehicle inspection in 2007, in İzmir, Kemaloğlu said all vehicle inspections nationwide will be completed by Feb. 15, 2009, and added that from that day onward only private vehicle inspection stations will have the authority to inspect vehicles.

The land transportation deputy general manager said there will be no major changes in the inspection fees as the prices are controlled by both the Ministry of the Treasury and the Ministry of Transportation. Kemaloğlu said every year more than 5,000 people are killed and 150,000 are injured in traffic accidents in Turkey and added the new inspection model will be influential in decreasing the number of traffic accidents.

Erman Yerdelen, the chairman of TÜVTÜRK -- the company operating the inspection stations -- said they won the privatization bid in 2007 with their bid of $613.5 million and added that they will invest a further $300 million for new stations that will be established. Yerdelen said they are planning to open 189 new stations in Turkey that meet Westerns standards. TÜVTÜRK General Manager Naci Başerdem said they will share their income with the Treasury every year, in addition to the privatization and investment charges, and added that in this way they will contribute $10 billion to the Treasury over 20 years.

 

05 July 2008, Saturday

TODAY'S ZAMAN İZMIR

 

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